One step closer to be human

Am just a trace of the traceless. Are you? :)
Greetings from dear lil island of singapore

Down syndrome helps researchers understand Alzheimer’s disease

neurosciencestuff:

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer’s disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Waisman Center. The findings are revealing more information about the earliest…

(Source: news.wisc.edu)

“Do not ever mark people by their sin, for Allah loves these three matters the most: Being moderate in your living, forgiving when your capable of doing so and being tender with the servants of Allah and whoever was tender with someone in this earthly world Allah will be tender with him on the Day of Resurrection”

—   Prophet Khidr (as) last advice to Prophet Musa (as), Al Khisal p111, Bihar al Anwar v13 p294/ v70 p386/v75 p453, Wasail ush Shia v11 p429, Mustadrak al Wasail v11 p294, (via 14noor)

mothernaturenetwork:

What’s a ‘facekini’? Swimwear and wrestling garb add up to bizarre fashion trend
Cautious swimmers in China are taking extreme measures — and a touch of ‘lucha libre’ to make sure the sun doesn’t harm their skin.

Uh oh hypocritical trend is here

ear2ear:

How to Disappear Completely | Online Shop

Should have taught me earlier XP

ear2ear:

How to Disappear Completely | Online Shop

Should have taught me earlier XP

neurosciencestuff:

Gambling with confidence: Are you sure about that?
Life is a series of decisions, ranging from the mundane to the monumental. And each decision is a gamble, carrying with it the chance to second-guess. Did I make the right turn at that light? Did I choose the right college? Was this the right job for me?
Our desire to persist along a chosen path is almost entirely determined by our confidence in the decision: when you are confident that your choice is correct, you are willing to stick it out for a lot longer.
Confidence determines much of our path through life, but what is it? Most people would describe it as an emotion or a feeling. In contrast, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have found that confidence is actually a measureable quantity, and not reserved just for humans. The team, led by CSHL Associate Professor Adam Kepecs, has identified a brain region in rats whose function is required for the animals to express confidence in their decisions.
How do we know when a rat is exhibiting confidence? The researchers devised a method to study decision making in these animals. The rats were offered an odor that they were trained to associate with one of two doors. When they chose the correct door, they were rewarded. This part was easy for the animals: their selections were almost always correct.­­ Things got trickier when Kepecs and his team offered a mixture of the two scents, with one dominating over the other by only a very small percentage. The rats now needed to choose the door representing the dominant odor in order to get their reward – a choice that reflects their best guess.
In work published today in Neuron, the team describes how confidence can be measured simply by challenging a rat to wait for the reward to be revealed behind the door. The time they are willing wait serves as a measure of the confidence in their original decision. “We found that the rats are willing to ‘gamble’ with their time,” Kepecs explains, sometimes waiting as much as 15 seconds, which is an eternity for these animals. “This is something that we can measure and create mathematical models to explain,” says Kepecs. “The time rats are willing to wait predicts the likelihood of correct decisions and provides an objective measure to track the feeling of confidence.”
The researchers hypothesized that a distinct region of the brain might control confidence. Previous work has suggested that the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a part of the brain involved in making predictions, might have a role in decision confidence. Kepecs and his team specifically shut off neurons in the OFC, inactivating it, and found that rats no longer exhibited appropriate levels of confidence in their decisions.
“With an inactive OFC, the rats retained the ability to make decisions – their accuracy did not change,” says Kepecs. “And they spent the same amount of time waiting for a reward on average. The only difference is that animals’ willingness to wait for a reward was no longer guided by confidence. They would often wait a long time even when they were wrong.”
The discovery offers a rare glimpse into the neuronal basis of a higher-level cognitive process, and is likely to have implications in human decision-making as well. As Kepecs describes, “we now know that the OFC is critical for making on-the-fly predictions in rats. The human OFC is just a more sophisticated version of the rodent counterpart.” The team is expanding their research to explore how the elusive feelings of confidence are based on objective predictions that influence human decisions as well.

neurosciencestuff:

Gambling with confidence: Are you sure about that?

Life is a series of decisions, ranging from the mundane to the monumental. And each decision is a gamble, carrying with it the chance to second-guess. Did I make the right turn at that light? Did I choose the right college? Was this the right job for me?

Our desire to persist along a chosen path is almost entirely determined by our confidence in the decision: when you are confident that your choice is correct, you are willing to stick it out for a lot longer.

Confidence determines much of our path through life, but what is it? Most people would describe it as an emotion or a feeling. In contrast, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have found that confidence is actually a measureable quantity, and not reserved just for humans. The team, led by CSHL Associate Professor Adam Kepecs, has identified a brain region in rats whose function is required for the animals to express confidence in their decisions.

How do we know when a rat is exhibiting confidence? The researchers devised a method to study decision making in these animals. The rats were offered an odor that they were trained to associate with one of two doors. When they chose the correct door, they were rewarded. This part was easy for the animals: their selections were almost always correct.­­ Things got trickier when Kepecs and his team offered a mixture of the two scents, with one dominating over the other by only a very small percentage. The rats now needed to choose the door representing the dominant odor in order to get their reward – a choice that reflects their best guess.

In work published today in Neuron, the team describes how confidence can be measured simply by challenging a rat to wait for the reward to be revealed behind the door. The time they are willing wait serves as a measure of the confidence in their original decision. “We found that the rats are willing to ‘gamble’ with their time,” Kepecs explains, sometimes waiting as much as 15 seconds, which is an eternity for these animals. “This is something that we can measure and create mathematical models to explain,” says Kepecs. “The time rats are willing to wait predicts the likelihood of correct decisions and provides an objective measure to track the feeling of confidence.”

The researchers hypothesized that a distinct region of the brain might control confidence. Previous work has suggested that the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a part of the brain involved in making predictions, might have a role in decision confidence. Kepecs and his team specifically shut off neurons in the OFC, inactivating it, and found that rats no longer exhibited appropriate levels of confidence in their decisions.

“With an inactive OFC, the rats retained the ability to make decisions – their accuracy did not change,” says Kepecs. “And they spent the same amount of time waiting for a reward on average. The only difference is that animals’ willingness to wait for a reward was no longer guided by confidence. They would often wait a long time even when they were wrong.”

The discovery offers a rare glimpse into the neuronal basis of a higher-level cognitive process, and is likely to have implications in human decision-making as well. As Kepecs describes, “we now know that the OFC is critical for making on-the-fly predictions in rats. The human OFC is just a more sophisticated version of the rodent counterpart.” The team is expanding their research to explore how the elusive feelings of confidence are based on objective predictions that influence human decisions as well.

Maybe i’ll just expose myself to different fields then get back to that qn again

I regained my all too familiar logic that full time degree is not possible, but i doubt i can cope with part-time degree either and gauging how much wasted time & less opportunities are in part-time. I’m at a loss when thinking of spending that amount of money & energy just to try to be in this rat race game of hierarchy

“Don’t expect much from a person who lacks the will to give it. I think that’s sadly the most common brand of self-imposed disappointments.”

ryanpanos:

Movie Theaters in South India | Stefanie Zoche

mom said that independent old cinemas are interesting but these are beautiful

(via travelthisworld)

patagonia:

Rok Rozman fly fishing on Sava river.Submitted by Anze Osterman
http://anzeosterman.tumblr.com
Instagram @anzeosterman
Web www.leeway-collective.com

patagonia:

Rok Rozman fly fishing on Sava river.

Submitted by Anze Osterman

http://anzeosterman.tumblr.com

Instagram @anzeosterman

Web www.leeway-collective.com

“Nothing more attractive than a beautiful person whose beauty isn’t what attracts you…”

—   

Reyna Biddy (via kushandwizdom)

More good vibes here

(via quotelounge)

(via 313-hopeful)